I myself was a pretty big Magic: The Gathering fanatic from 18 – 21 years of age. Though I didn’t setup any website about it, I did cojoin a site related to Dungeons and Dragons content and provided GM tools written in excel for download. At the time I never had much interest in branching out and starting my own sites for profit and 10 years later I started up my blogs. Had I only started ten years earlier I would be in a vastly different place than I am now, but as they say hindsight is 20/20
The income Iam earning Yaro is just the two figures and Iam not happy at all. I have read the blog profits blueprint, the roadmap and a lot of your blog posts but I dont know were I could be failing. I know I have read were you say you didnt like adsense but I thought I could make it work. If maybe you take a look at my site you can be able to help. I actually use your stile of writing and I even borrowed your buyline
Start by taking other courses you’re interested in: Not only is this important competitor and opportunity analysis, but it also gives you an idea of how a course could or should look and feel. What’s the pacing like? Is it via email, video, in-person chats? Once you understand how you want your course to look, it’s time to decide what it should include. Those same courses are a great starting place. How can you make your course better or more interesting? Do you have experience others don’t?
Swap.com. Like ThredUp, it's an online consignment store. You send in used clothes (women, kids, men's) and kids toys and games, and Swap will sell them for you. Hopefully. They may reject them, in which case you'll either have to pay a fee to get your things back or donate them. But assuming you're sending in clothes and toys that people will want to buy, your odds of selling them should be good. The website says that "sellers, on average, earn about $150 per box they sell on Swap.com when sending in-season, high-quality items." Especially note the words, "high-quality."
The final point is really important to me because I know that my interest tends to fluctuate. Every five years or so I feel like moving on to something new and leaving my main project. In the case of business, I want to ensure that there is a profitable exit strategy. The better you meet the previous criteria (profit margin, automated, scaleable and passive), the more money you can make when it is time to sell.
You can also market your ebook on your own website or blog, particularly if the site gets good traffic. Still another method is affiliate marketing. You can offer to pay sites related to your ebook a percentage of the sale price – say, anywhere between 20% and 50% – for them to post an ad or linked article for your book on their site. This could enable you to market your ebook on multiple platforms for greater market exposure.

Fiverr. This is a popular website that can be helpful for freelancers with actual skills. Know something about digital animation? You can work for someone who doesn't and pick up some extra cash. But if you just have a brain but few skills, you can offer to do web research for someone, and maybe someone will hire you. Just know that you probably aren't going to get rich doing these jobs. The website's tag line is, "Freelance services for the lean entrepreneur," which tells you right away the pay is – meh. Plus, the website's name comes from the fact that many people work for $5 per task (but, yes, you can ask for more). Still, if you get a lot of gigs, it can add up.

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